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many do, they can't. it then have to take a job in some high-paying position. and if they went to law school they're going to go into corporate law. in a be bored to tears, but they have to for a least 510 years to get the money to then be able to do their passion. that's a big difference. when i wrote in the 1970's, the most famous business book, and it remains to the day is what color is your parachute. and that he says there was from a start out following a passion. you can afford to do that as a 25 year-old who is finished college? have to work, get some -- you know, it takes a decade to pay off those college loans for most people unless they came from all of the family. in the other thing that i think is a bigot vantage, the boomer generation which was the generation that inherited -- we actually started it. a little bit older. inherited the revolution and push it forward. 80 percent white. the generation of young people today thank goodness is far more diversified, and there are a lot of young african american asian-american, in the american, hispanics who voted for obama, very
in some high paid position. if they went to law school to go to corporate law and be bored to tears, but they have to do it for five, 10 years to get the money to do their passion. that's a big difference. when i wrote passages in the 1970s, the most famous business book and remains to today's what color is your parachute? the thesis they are to start out following your passion. who can afford to do that is a 25-year-old who finished college? they have to work and get some -- it takes a decade to pay off those loans for most people unless they came from wealthy families. the other thing that is a big advance is the boomer generation inherited the feminist revolution and pushed it forward. 80% way. the generation of young people today is far more diversified and there's a lot of young african-american, asian indian american, hispanic who voted for obama, who are very much responsible for the reelection of obama and who are hoping to mentor younger, poorer women, which were left out of the revolution. women who didn't have a lot to do for even lower middle-class women. there is a lot
. we need prosecutors in the system. they are important. they enforce the law. we need them to do it in a way that's fair. we need to figure out how to hold them accountable because a lot of their actions can and do produce in justices in the system. >> host: professor davis, is there power institutionalized in law, or is it just developed over the years? >> guest: it's interesting. the idea -- prosecutors, a system of public prosecution started right around the time of jacksonian democracy with a view that we wanted to vote for people and hold them accountable, the whole idea of democracy is that the people choose the individuals to perform the functions, and so when we start to get the public prosecution -- because in the past, there was private individuals who were able to bring charges against other individuals and they would pay for it. that didn't last long. we ended up with a public prosecution system and ended up with elected prosecutors for the state and local system so all of our states, except about four of them, have elected officials for their state and local prosecut
. they are important and enforceable law but we need them to do it in a way that is fair and we need to find out how to hold them accountable because a lot of their actions can and do produce in justices in the system. >> host: professor davis is the power institutionalized and tell all or just developed over the years? >> guest: the system of public prosecutions started right around the time of the democracy when we had this view that we wanted to vote for people and hold them accountable the people choose the individuals to perform these functions, and so when we start to get this prosecution because in the past there used to be practices, individuals, private individuals are able to bring charges against other individuals and they have to pay for it. that didn't last very long and then there was the prosecution system for the state and local system, so all of our states except for about four of them had elected officials for the state. federal prosecutors are appointed but state and local our elective officials and that ev process is supposed to be the way that we the people hold prosecutors acco
with the administrative law judge. his decision two days after it was over, he said unequivocally ems was right. the testimony by the union are unbelievable and contrived. we won the decision and all the unfair labor practices they filed against the state filed 50 against us were thrown out. two days after that, that decision was appealed not by the seiu but by the united states government. you have to understand the link, the union's money is a money come. it is support certain politicians to get into office and they use it to payback unions and that is what happened at the national labor relations board. that is why they appealed the decision and it took almost a year but finally went to the board of the national labor relations board and we won the decision 3-0. our people were happy. the sad thing is people all over the midwest with other companies didn't stand up like we did and people are now subjected to this and they are paying union dues and not making any more money. i am here today because i want to help people. their goal is survival. and the public needs to know what is going on. w
suggestions there. there's a number of states where unions have exemptions from antistalking laws. so pennsylvania, a number of other states, special exemption from anti-stalking laws just for unions. and that allows the unions to put a lot of pressure not just on employers like dave, but on individual employees. and i think those exemptions ought to be removed. there's also a lot of exemptions from the anti-extortion laws for unions. so there's another rico violation being prosecuted in upstate new york in the syracuse area where you had, basically, the building and construction departments were going and doing s like pouring -- things like pouring sand into the heavy equipment in a lot of nonunion place operators and basically telling them, hey, you've got to the hire them, or we're going to see to it the project doesn't get built. the union's basically -- [inaudible] but we have an exemption from the federal anti-extortion laws, and you can't prosecute us from doing this. and the kicker is they're right. they may be prosecuted under the state anti-extortion statutes, but that's som
and medicine and unhealthy food and unsafe and unhealthy workplaces. if i said that maybe we should have a law protecting people from being harassed if they are gay or lesbian. if i said that we should have some kind of national health insurance, if i said that what we need in this country is an end to lynching and the right for african-americans to have the right to vote, all of those things and many more you think i was a utopian. you would think i was maybe somewhat crazy. i was unrealistic, i was impractical or maybe i was even a bolshevik or communist or socialist. and everything i just said is now taken for granted, things that our society accepts as normal. so one of the themes of my book is that the radical ideas of one generation are often the common sense of the next or subsequent generation. and the book is really about the 100 americans who made that happen. so people who helped to build the labor movement, help to build the women's suffrage and the women rights movement, helped to build the civil rights movement, the environmental movement, the gay and lesbian rights movement, the
of law, but moving it to the 21st century where our brand which is not around the world would allow high high achieving people with great aspirations to come and create opportunities for all of us and then third transformation and not reform anymore but real transformation of our education system so more and more children can gain the power of knowledge and be successful in life. [applause] we are the most energy abundant country in the world. 10 years ago or 12 years ago we were about ready to no longer have natural gas. it was an amazing thing people were building billion-dollar plans to import liquefied natural gas into our country and today we have so much gas we don't know what to do with it. that is because of american ingenuity and technology. a greek immigrant combining two existing technologies hydraulic fracking and horizontal drilling created the greatest explosion of innovation in the last decade at times certainly competing with the commercialization of the internet. there should be bans and parade celebrating this incredible thing we are now on the precipice of being energy
at the high-growth economic strategy, respecting the rule of law and moving it to where our brand, not tarnish around the world would allow people with high aspirations to become great opportunity for all of us. third, we need stem to stern transformation, real transformation of our education system so more and more children gain the power of knowledge can be successful in life. [applause] we are the most energy abundant country in the world. 10 years ago for 12 years ago were ready to no longer have natural gas. people were building billion-dollar plans to import into our country and it's so much guess we don't want to do with it because of american ingenuity and american technology. a greek immigrant combining two existing technologies, pitchout fracturing and horizontal drilling created the greatest competing with commercialization of the internet. there should be dancing parade celebrating this incredible thing we are now on the precipice of being energy secure and all the benefits. unfortunately because much of this has taken place in west texas and north dakota, it's not cool. there's a
. my sister-in-law, my best friend. i grew up around teachers and having an incredible respect for the difficult job that they have every day. and i still surrounded by teachers to this day. and i think that it is because i have such respect for teachers and told them in such regard i have a tremendous believe for what they can do and the power that they have, and i refuse to believe what many folks these days say which is if kids are coming from difficult situations and poverty there is nothing the schools can do. i roundly reject that notion. i think that when children are in the classrooms of truly effective teachers even despite the fact they may face a lot of obstacles those kids can achieve the highest levels and so we should aspire to nothing short as a nation making sure every single kid is in the classroom with a highly effective teacher every single day. it's no less than what we would want for our own children and nothing different than we should want for the nation's kids. >> michelle, if the united states spends the most per capita, per student with the rank and 25
is good. stanford's law office burns in a fire, he loses his files, he loses his law books, and he decides i don't want to be a lawyer, i'm going to california. he goes to california and joins his brothers. he borrows money from them, he opens a shop in the mountains called stanford and smith and sells to miners. stanford is a taciturn businessman. he's practically wordless. anybody who met him reported the same thing, he has five words an hour. he is laconic to the point of pathology. [laughter] but he's an amiable behind the cash register, and he deals straight, and so he succeeds rapidly as a shopkeeper. he moves his shop to sacramento, the capital of california. now, the capital of california in the mid 1850s had the enormous population of 12,000 people. it's a cow town, but he becomes the grocer in town who sells the best goods. next door to him there's another shop which is a hardware store called huntington and hopkins run by a couple of guys who sell hardware. and one day in 1858 hopkins, stanford and huntington receive this salesman who's coming through town trying to pump up the
. >> host: professor gould, what do you teach in law school? >> guest: criminal law in the law school, and i actually also teach over in the college of -- school of public affairs. >> host: what do you teach there? >> guest: law and society. >> host: what sparked you to write "how to succeed in college"? >> guest: great question. i taught for over 20 years now, and i saw some of the same problems from students over and over and over again, things like not understanding how to cite material and inadvertently getting in trouble with plagarism, a student seeing college, take advantage of everything in the classroom, and i e-mail students with hints and the like, and i sent the same e-mails out year after year, and i thought, you know what, time to write the book to say, "buy the book," and i don't have to send the e-mails out. >> host: what's the best thing parents can do to prepare their kids? >> guest: a couple things. one is the academic side. the best thing that students can do to be prepared for college is reading and writing, and i know that sounds old school, but it is true today as it w
discretionary spending. then what is agreed to infil law that came at the end of that dreadful process of holding the debt ceiling hostage. so unilaterally declared that to the floor for cuts and not a ceiling and now it is a way of avoiding the sequestration of the defense budget to the remarkable set of additional cutbacks and means tested programs of one sort or another. i even solve the most analytic reporters that david rogers of politico showed in the course of writing about that. and of course we had yesterday a successful republican filibuster on the senate democratic plan extending the law were student loan rate in financing it in a particular way. i know in "the new york times" this is the 21st successful republican filibuster in this congress. most of it is not if you will consequential and the filibuster was in the first two years because there was a republican house and democratic wishes from the white house and the senate are not likely to be realized but the fact is that it has been so commonplace and it's taken for granted in most press reports the word filibuster never
a new very well with our relationship he served more terms as president he declared martial law. a revolution was possible and then on dialysis. one was said of the naval forces had retired. john reed was the head of citicorp in the philippines. we had dinner with the president i decided i would wait until dinner was over. [laughter] use step down at the top of the game rather than and lose. i will win the election but nobody would believe that. step down while you can. he went on and the election was held there was uprising and it went to hell and to take him out by a helicopter where he died. how many insurance companies provide those services to the country? [laughter] there are many others. but the point* is to say how different we were in the valuable assets to the country. thousands of people made that possible. the second part is what happened. new york disgraced attorney general, than decided there was a lot on the books called the martin act enacted 1921 designed to go after bootleggers, it is silent as to intent. if you accuse somebody of a fraudulent act, he took the
-- laws your hard was it to get to next and when you wrote about him in the 50's? >> i get a lot of credit to timothy who was the director of the nixon library. a lot of stuff was open and you can go down there and go through this coming you can go to the archives and find the more time you spend, the more things you would discover. i began to get fascinated by the notes that mix and wrote on the yellow pad he would write down almost -- ki was like an a student. everything he did and saw he would take notes. eisenhower did him a big favor in the fall all throughout asia and in vietnam he met the emperor and they basically said he saw the future in a way he didn't like it, but you can see nixon reflecting and being resentful and when he saw that eisenhower was trying to get rid of him in 1956 he was writing down things. it's the president's choice, for the good of the party to the issue is basically writing his own sort of speech. he never said it but you could find all these things and it's all there and you've got to keep looking. the other thing that is important, and tama could talk abo
enforcing prohibition and they had to start enforcing traffic laws, there was resistance from citizens. and to see how, what was once a cooperative relationship between citizens and police really changed once police had to start ticketing people for driving or making arrests for people who were drinking liquor. alcohol was banned in virginia a few years before national legislation was passed. there were people who believed that if they could just go out onto a poet in the potomac and consume liquor, then that was not illegal because they weren't technically in virginia. earlier the alexandria police department didn't need a lot of vehicles. they didn't need a lot of motorcycles. it was a pretty small area they were responsible for patrolling, and so to see the size of alexandria double and then double again in a matter of pretty much 20 years really changed the department, increased staffing, more vehicles and then, ultimately, they had to move to a new police station pause they just couldn't fit in their original station house. one of the stories that i found really interesting is how
interesting things about the way pat and law has evolved in this country. one thing that i have learned in doing the research for my book is that the idea that an invention is some brand new idea to a sort of incorrect because, of course, everything comes from what came before. in fact, in my mind that is one of the key points about tinkering. tinkering is actually taking what is around you and trying to make something new out of it. even though lazar bugs upper which intellectual ventures have developed, bits of me that they actually built it out of spare parts from consumer electronics that they bought off the date. so, you know, i think that was something that they wanted to do a lot of waste. so, you know, i understand people come up with a great idea and are free we're going to steal it, but the reality is that it does not usually work that way. usually people tried steal it once it's already successful. so if you can get to that point they have i class problem. so, you know, i think it's natural for people, especially young people to think that what they've come up with, you know,
by 2015 to achieve i think it's 35% efficiency. it's a law. i don't know about the -- zonal enough about the ins and outs of washington, when you ask a lot don't you have to do something? so it is happening, it's a law so that would be important and it would give benefit aside from environmental benefits, benefit to the taxpayers because you would be paying 30% less for energy for all the government holdings and it would set off the market in spill into the private market. people would think about it more. in terms of renewables, another thing people don't know is can the energy department. the u.s. energy department said i 2017, wind power to generate a kilowatt of wind power's going to be at parity with coal and it's going to be cheaper than nuclear power. this is not me. this is the energy department. now solar is more expensive but solar has also been coming down very dramatically so it's not bite 2017 and some people think it will be but solar power will be a parody. the only source of energy at which renewables will not be across parity is fracking, natural gas. this technology fra
the library and soldering but i think that you will in the future because the law which can come from all different directions and you always need to know how to solder if you are going to put something up in the technology to get there. succumb also i mentioned what westport has posted and i know there is another one coming up in april. just a great way to see what different people from different walks of life are working on. i know that i went with my kids to the last one and we saw all sorts of stuff. here are some photographs of the 3g printers that kids were making fun stuff with and i know one of the biggest was from the last year with the basketball playing a robot's which were astonishingly accurate that were controlled by high school students a bill to them with laptops and what is interesting is that the robots were built as part of the first robotics competition which is something that yadin actually founded. so, again, there are all of these -- it is not just that there is a lot of tinkering among them going on, but there are a lot of interesting efforts out there right now to
of the national archives to try to get back to tapes, congress intervened and passed a special law at the nixon library's the only library governed by one law, presidential recordings of 1974. that will stick to that first of all that we, members of the public, had the right to get any information about the use of government power. but also protected. president nixon, former now, president nixon and sued, it was a long struggle, it took years. and, in fact, only now are the tapes coming out. when i was there we released about 630 hours. there's another big dump of import material coming out i hope this year. it's taken years for the staff to come up, and that's because of richard nixon and his estate. so they did not want these tapes to come out. the same with the papers. nixon sued the national archives, and it dragged down. in fact, when i was there there were 35,000 pages that are found in the fault that i got out that had been put in there because the national archives is afraid of what richard nixon and others reaction would be. didn't change the world. there's of other really good mentor
money's worth of a student, i am in favor of that. >> what do you teach in law school? >> criminal call and also in the college of riss school of public affairs. >> host: what are you teaching? >> guest: society. >> host: what sparked you to say this is why exceed in college. >> host: i'm beginning to see i was seeing the same problems over and over again. things like not understanding how to side material and inadvertently getting themselves into plagiarism. they would come in and see this great new world that is college and take advantage of everything in the classroom. and i regularly immelt my students of henson. i began to see that i was sending the same females out year after year and i thought it's time to write the book therefore i can say i don't have to keep sending the e-mails. >> host: what is the best thing that parents can do to protect their kids? >> guest: one is the academic side and the best thing students can do to prepare for colleges reading and writing and i know that sounds old school but it's true today as it was when i went to college that's the best thing we ca
police have started prohibition and they started enforcing traffic laws. and to see how, what was once a co-op would've relationship between citizens and police really changed once they had to circuiting people for driving or seeking arrest while drinking liquor. alcohol was banned in virginia two years before national legislation was passed. there were people who believed that they could just go out on the potomac and consume liquor, then that was legal because they were not technically in virginia. earlier the police department needed a lot of vehicles. it was a pretty small area. they were responsible for patrolling and started seeing the size of alexandria double and then double again in a matter of 20 years, really changed the department. the staffing, more vehicles, and ultimately they needed a new police station. one of the stories i find really interesting is how officers began enforcing speed limits. for the like the first 40 years of please departments history you didn't have cars. they were not motorized vehicles. so once cars started coming to alexandria, the question was h
reform of our immigration laws so that we can bring young, aspirational people that will rebuild the demographic pyramid to make our entitlement system secure and jump-start our economy in a way that will create an uplifting of our hopes and dreams, but also directly impact, immediately impact economic growth. >> u.s. economic growth and immigration policy. former florida governor jeb bush on immigration wars tonight at 8:15 eastern. part of booktv this weekend on c-span2. >> we have allowed a human rights nightmare to occur on our watch. in the years since dr. king's death, a vast new system of racial and social control has emerged from the ashes of slavery and jim crow. a system of mass incarceration that no doubt has dr. king turning in his grave today. the mass incarceration of poor people of color in the united states is tantamount to a new caste-like system, one that shuttles our young people from decrepit, underfunded schools to brand new, high-tech prisons. it is a system that locks poor people, overwhelmingly poor people of color, into a permanent second class status nea
of slavery and jim crow law. the system of mass incarceration and no doubt has doctor king turning in his grave today. the mass incarceration of people of color in the united states is paramount to a new caste system, one that shuttles are young people. it has a permanent second-class status, nearly as effectively as the earlier assistance of racial and social control. it is, in my view, the moral equivalent of jim crow. on tuesday, march 26, join us live for twitter and facebook. one prosecutors crusade against crime and corruption is next on booktv. he sat down with us in virginia during our recent visit. >> you're sitting in the conference room of the arlington county sheriff. this is the shotgun that was used by the prosecutor in the early 20th century. a guy by the name of crandal mackey. the selected as the commonwealth attorney and he conducted a series of raids where he shut down brothels and saloons and all kinds of dangerous places. i've used this shotgun when he conducted those roots. crandal mackey was from south carolina. his father was a prominent judge and author in south c
. they start enforcing traffic laws. and you see how it was under the corporate relationships. they really changed. we have to start. the chocoholic in virginia a few years before. he got onto the potomac double and double again. premeds 20 years. it changes the department. the staffing, more vehicles, and ultimately the police station. one of the things i find really interesting is officers began enforcing speed limits. from the first 47 years of the police department's history they didn't have cars. they had emergency situations. there were not motorized vehicles. so once cars started coming through alexandria, sibila said to be put into quite -- place. at the stop somebody for speeding? and today we have radar, so many techniques. 1910, 1911, we have no way do that. pretty resourceful. two officers standing in one corner of one block and in two blocks up yet another. they had somebody between those two blocks. so they knew what the maximum speed was and the distance that could be covered. that's how you would determine if someone is actually speeding. able to approach this. it's all ano
of great conviction. he supported passionately fighting bob lawfulness progressive party campaign for the presidency in 1924. he passionately supported henry wallace's campaign in 1848 and 50 if he had won he would make whitespace treasury secretary. he was a true believer, but he took orders from nobody. >> i don't think i need a mic for this question. it's a simple question. do you have anything in your book about the relationship of harry dexter white and alger hiss? >> no, i don't. i don't know what position should arise. we know they interacted at san francisco, but i actually did not come across anything in the archives about the interaction between the two of them. i would say i'm a basis of wood and the archival material in particular soviet intelligence cables severed decrypt data under the so-called winona project that white was probably more important to soviet television and alger hiss was. the case sort of died out after 1948 because white died of a heart attack two days after giving testimony before the house un-american activities committee. but he actually turns in
. it kind of 2600 was the successor and a lot of ways. i've read 26 under the law. like the curiosity that it embodied. the problem that comes up with curiosity is curiosity is the crime in my opinion. crime is a crime. the problem is the curiosity often leads people to do things that are illegal. people do illegal things for lots of reasons, sex and money, drugs and illegal, whenever. it turns out curiosity is one of those things. i think that is the thing that i sort of struggle the little bit as i was writing this book and then also resulting now, the curiosity is, think of awesome. it is actually advocating and you should go out and break into a computer, try some of these files now whenever it is. that part at all like. but from a curiosity perspective, from an information perspective a lot of stuff like that. >> what if any other titles did you come up with? >> the titles. this is a long story and is not really good story. and give you the short version. we originally were going to call it phone phreaks. actually, originally ridge is going to college freaks. my friend jennifer s
with her mother-in-law, fot pst lady usigail adams. we will include your questions and comments by phone, faceb le and twitter monday night at 9:00 eastern on c-in aan and ouldin and also cer-pan radio and c-span.org. >> the british nnt any had out lae toe impact on the war of 18. in alexandria, va. with the help of o or l foal c usle partner comcast we sat down with denver to discuss the nnt any admot pa. his book is the evil necessity:british naval imprisonment in the atlantihem worure. it is next on booktv. >> the british empot pe in the 18th-cenhry was really a maritime and hire. as an island nation they dnshended hent anon controlling the trade of various colonor l territories. eor this work they neey powerful navy and the nnt any needed meledg so british naval ships sailed the world but were ein aecor ll avaoncentrated in the atlantic d this is how the system affected american colonists. when british naval vessels came into various ports they often lost men because of death, disease and desertion and the only way they couure resupply theot p ships was to capture colonists. in that
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